Language Sites
  • UCAN China
  • UCAN India
  • UCAN Indonesia
  • UCAN Vietnam

Philippine diocese extends food-for-poor program

Huge response from Child Jesus feast keeps free food drive going

Philippine diocese extends food-for-poor program
Dancers at the Ati-Atihan festival in Kalibo (Photo courtesy of tourism-philippines.com)
Jun Ariolo N. Aguirre, Kalibo, Aklan
Philippines

January 7, 2011

Mail This Article
(For more than one recipient, type addresses separated by commas)


Kalibo diocese in the central Philippines, is extending a food program for the poor, following an outpouring of support from devotees of the Santo Nino (Child Jesus). We began serving food to parishioners on Dec. 16 and the program was supposed to end on Christmas Day, said Annie Reyes who works at the bishop’s house. “But there were many sponsors and volunteers who joined the program,” she told ucanews.com. She said the diocese, which is in Aklan province is busy preparing for the Ati-Atihan festival next week. Ati-Atihan is a festival that honors the Child Jesus. It is named after the Ati tribe that has lived in the area even before the arrival of the Malays in the 10th century and the Spaniards in the 16th century. The feeding program dubbed “Hakid it Sto. Nino” (Food offering by the Child Jesus) is held daily at six o’clock in the morning at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. “Anybody, rich or poor, gets some food. The program was originally intended for street children and poor families attending dawn Masses last Christmas, but the diocese was amazed by the support, so we now serve everybody,” said Reyes. Hundreds of people are coming every day and are served by some 30 volunteers who were working in shifts, she said. Most of those who come are residents of a nearby slum. Related reports Seminarians usher in Christmas with song Catholics hope to put feast on tourist map Concern for family compels seamen to save, start businesses back home PV12753.1635
UCAN needs your support to continue our independent journalism
Access to UCAN stories is completely free of charge - however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content. UCAN relies almost entirely on donations from our readers and donor organizations that support our mission. If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation. Click here to donate now.
La Civiltà Cattolica
 

LATEST

Support Our Journalism

Access to UCAN stories is completely free of charge - however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content. UCAN relies almost entirely on donations from our readers and donor organizations that support our mission. If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation.

Quick Donate

Or choose your own donation amount