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Filipino Bishop Elenito Galido of Iligan dies

Bishop, 64, had been battling liver cancer, diabetes for several years

Filipino Bishop Elenito Galido of Iligan dies

Bishop Elenito Galido of Iligan had been battling liver cancer for several years. (Photo by Roy Lagarde)

 

December 6, 2017

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Filipino Bishop Elenito Galido of Iligan in Lanao del Norte province died on Dec. 6 after a long illness.

He became the seventh Catholic bishop to pass away in the Philippines this year.

The Catholics Bishops Conference of the Philippines said the 64-year-old Galido died at the Mercy Hospital in Iligan City after being admitted to the intensive care unit last week. He was diagnosed with liver cancer a few years ago and also suffered from diabetes.

Just before his death, Galido was at the forefront of church efforts to help the thousands of families displaced by the conflict in Marawi City.

He "died with his boots on, almost literally," said Bishop Edwin de la Pena of Marawi

"He welcomed me into his home like a real brother, not only as an evacuee fleeing from war during the early part of the Marawi siege," he said.

Bishop Galido was born on April 18, 1954 in Managok, Malaybalay City, Bukidnon.

He completed theology studies at the St. Francis Xavier Regional Major Semnary in Davao City and was ordained a priest on April 25, 1979.

In March 2006, Pope Benedict XVI appointed him as bishop of Iligan.

At the time he was serving as an associate priest at the St. Francis de Sales Church in Brooklyn, New York, while completing his master's degree in Pastoral Counseling and Spiritual Care.

His episcopal ordination was on Sept. 8, 2006.

He was the chairman of the bishops' conference's Commission on Culture.

 

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