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Fake bishop tries to sneak into Vatican meeting

From AFP, March 5

Fake bishop tries to sneak into Vatican meeting
AFP/ABC
Vatican City

March 5, 2013

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A man dressed in fake ecclesiastical robes was escorted out of a meeting of Catholic cardinals by Swiss Guards after trying to sneak into the closed-door Vatican meeting.

The man, whose real name is Ralph Napierski, introduced himself to reporters as "Basilius" and said he was a member of the "Italian Orthodox Church", which does not exist.

Before he was discovered, he told reporters Catholic bishops had "made a mistake by moving priests" who were accused of paedophilia around different parishes.

He was wearing a purple scarf around his waist that was similar to the sashes worn by senior Catholic prelates, and he shook hands and chatted with priests and cardinals arriving at the meeting.

Security guards say they realised he was an imposter because his purple sash was too short and he was wearing a black fedora.

Roman Catholic cardinals from around the world have started a week of closed-door meetings before choosing a successor to Pope Benedict XVI.

During the talks they will decide the opening date for the conclave where the new pontiff is elected.

Mr Napierski claims on his blog he is a founder of the Corpus Dei Catholic order. He also says he invented "a system to enable persons to control computers with the power of thoughts".

Original story: Fake bishop tries to sneak into Vatican meeting 

Source: ABC News

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