Language Sites
  • UCAN China
  • UCAN India
  • UCAN Indonesia
  • UCAN Vietnam

China confiscates Qurans in Xinjiang

Muslim holy books printed before 2012 found to have 'extremist content'

China confiscates Qurans in Xinjiang

Uighur Muslims attend Friday prayers inside the Yanhan Mosque in Urumqi, the capital of northwest China's Xinjiang province in this file photo. Authorities are confiscating Qurans printed before 2012, saying the contain 'extremist content.' (Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP)

May 29, 2017

Mail This Article
(For more than one recipient, type addresses separated by commas)


Authorities in northwestern China's Xinjiang region are confiscating all Qurans published more than five years ago due to "extremist content," according to local officials,.

The move is part of an ongoing campaign against "illegal" religious items owned by mostly Muslim ethnic Uyghur residents.

Village chiefs from Barin township, in Kashgar (in Chinese, Kashi) prefecture's Peyziwat (Jiashi) county, recently told Radio Free Asia's Uyghur Service that hundreds of the Islamic holy books printed before 2012 had been seized since authorities issued an order recalling them on Jan. 15.

The Qurans were appropriated as part of the "Three Illegals and One Item" campaign underway in Xinjiang that bans "illegal" publicity materials, religious activities, and religious teaching, as well as items deemed by authorities to be tools of terrorism, they said.

Emet Imin, the party secretary of Barin's No. 1 village, told RFA that authorities had confiscated 500 books in the recent campaign sweep of households beginning in January

"They can keep Qurans that were published after August 2012, according to an order from the top, but they are not allowed to keep any other versions," Imin said.

Imin said that according to the order he received from his superiors, there were "problems" in the earlier version of the Quran related to "some signs of extremism."

"Therefore, we issued a notice on Jan. 15 urging residents to hand over older Qurans and warning them they would bear the consequences if banned versions were found in their homes," he said.

UCAN needs your support to continue our independent journalism
Access to UCAN stories is completely free of charge - however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content. UCAN relies almost entirely on donations from our readers and donor organizations that support our mission. If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation. Click here to donate now.
La Civiltà Cattolica
 

LATEST

Support Our Journalism

Access to UCAN stories is completely free of charge - however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content. UCAN relies almost entirely on donations from our readers and donor organizations that support our mission. If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation.

Quick Donate

Or choose your own donation amount