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Catholics donate blood to dengue patients in Bangladesh

Outbreaks of the tropical disease have increased this year, particularly in capital Dhaka

Catholics donate blood to dengue patients in Bangladesh

A total of 65 people have died of dengue in Bangladesh this year. (Photo: Stephan Uttom/UCA News)

Catholic groups are donating blood to tackle a dengue outbreak in Bangladesh.

Caritas Bangladesh, hospital staff, seminarians, youths and other church-related institutes are providing blood unconditionally.

“Outbreaks of dengue have increased in Bangladesh, especially in Dhaka, after coronavirus,” Father Kamal Corraya, director of St. John Vianney Hospital in Dhaka, told UCA News.

After Anwar Hossain's 10-year-old son contracted dengue, he received two bags of blood from the Christian Blood Donation Group.

“I did not want to take blood from any blood bank and was looking for a group of people who donate blood voluntarily. After seeing the group on Facebook and communicating with them, I was able to get what I wanted,” said the 35-year-old high school teacher.

Patrick Purification, president of the Bangladesh Catholic Student Movement, said the group donates blood throughout the year.

Caritas Bangladesh has the blood data of over 4,000 staff and donates blood as required

“We think that if we help today, tomorrow someone will help us. I gave blood myself. Giving blood also brings peace of mind,” he told UCA News.

Caritas Bangladesh has the blood data of over 4,000 staff and donates blood as required, according to Dr. Edward Pallab Rozario, president of the Association of Bangladesh Catholic Doctors.

A total of 65 people have died of dengue in Bangladesh this year, according to the health department.

In September, 7,434 dengue patients have been admitted to hospitals, while 17,790 have been admitted and 17,071 discharged in the year to date.

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Dengue fever is a vector-borne tropical disease carried by female aedes mosquitoes. Usually, patients show symptoms — such as high fever, headache, vomiting, muscle and joint pains and skin rashes — two to three weeks after being bitten.

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