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Bishop questions 'most trusted' tag for Manila cop shop

Survey giving positive views on police station at center of Philippine drug killings controversy riles local prelate

Bishop questions 'most trusted' tag for Manila cop shop

Bishop Pablo Virgilio David of Kalookan. (Photo by Vincent Go)

 

ucanews.com reporter, Manila
Philippines

February 8, 2018

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A bishop vocal in condemning drug-related killings in the Philippines has questioned the result of a survey that labeled a police station, whose personnel were linked to the slayings, as the "most trusted" in the country's capital.

"Most trusted by whom?" asked Bishop Pablo Virgilio David of Kalookan in the northern part of Metro Manila where the police station is also located.

Many of the killings linked to the government's war on narcotics occurred in his diocese.

The prelate questioned the basis of the assessment.

"[Trusted] by those who gauge the trustworthiness of the police by the number of drug suspects killed during [the police operations]?" asked the bishop.

The survey conducted by the National Police Commission in October and November 2017 and released this week showed that Caloocan police station received a trust rating of 88.8 percent.

"If they were 'most trusted' for 2017, then why did General [Oscar] Albayalde sack the whole Caloocan police force last September? Just wondering," added Bishop David who is also vice president of the Catholic bishops' conference.

General Albayalde, head of the National Capital Region Police Office, ordered the suspension of several policemen following the deaths of two young boys during anti-narcotics police operations.

In August last year, the killing of the teenage boys sparked protests around the capital.

Rights groups claim that about 13,000 people have died in the government's anti-narcotics war. The police have said only about 3,000 people have died during police operations.

 

 

 


 

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