Language Sites
  • UCAN China
  • UCAN India
  • UCAN Indonesia
  • UCAN Vietnam

Amnesty urges end to executions in Indonesia

Call comes after criticism by UN rights body

Ryan Dagur, Jakarta
Indonesia

August 1, 2013

Mail This Article
(For more than one recipient, type addresses separated by commas)


Amnesty International has urged the government to respond to recent recommendations by the United Nations Human Rights Committee calling for amendments to the use of the death penalty and considering an all-out ban.

The committee held consultations with an Indonesia delegation this month in Geneva after which it made recommendations urging the government to reconsider capital punishment outside of the “most serious crimes” including drug offenses.

“Amnesty International believes that if effectively implemented the recommendations would strengthen the protection and promotion civil and political rights in the country,” it said in a statement yesterday.

The UN rights committee also recommended abolishing the death penalty altogether in Indonesia.

There was no response from the Indonesian government.

The thorny issue of capital punishment was submitted for judicial review in the Constitutional Court in 2007 which included a review of the 1997 narcotics law. However, the court ruled that the use of the death penalty did not contradict the right to life under the constitution.

During its Un rights committee periodic review in May last year, Indonesia rejected recommendations to abolish capital punishment or establish a moratorium on executions arguing that it was only used in rare and serious cases.

Six months later Indonesia abstained during a UN General Assembly vote on all member states to suspend executions with a view to abolishing the death penalty.

Indonesia executed 133 people between 1998 and December last year with 71 convicted of drugs crimes, according to the Attorney-General’s office.

UCAN needs your support to continue our independent journalism
Access to UCAN stories is completely free of charge - however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content. UCAN relies almost entirely on donations from our readers and donor organizations that support our mission. If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation. Click here to donate now.
La Civiltà Cattolica
 

LATEST

Support Our Journalism

Access to UCAN stories is completely free of charge - however it costs a significant amount of money to provide our unique content. UCAN relies almost entirely on donations from our readers and donor organizations that support our mission. If you are a regular reader and are able to support us financially, please consider making a donation.

Quick Donate

Or choose your own donation amount