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The politics of civil liberties in Indonesia Whats this?
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Crackdown on radical groups aims to remove intimidation and violence creeping into country's democratic process

The politics of civil liberties in Indonesia

Members of Hizb ut-Tahrir Indonesia during a 2012 rally in Jakarta to protest the "Innocence of Muslims" film. (ucanews.com photo) 

Max Regus, Jakarta
Indonesia

August 10, 2017

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President Widodo has put on a dramatic political performance in recent weeks. On July 10 he introduced a regulation that allows the government to ban groups that go against "national unity and the existence of the Indonesian nation." He followed this by banning Hizb ut-Tahrir, a group known as an anti-Pancasila organization.

While some elements of Indonesian society support Widodo, non-governmental organizations are lining up in opposition. They argue that Widodo is moving in an authoritarian direction.  

 

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