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Survivor found at Bangladesh disaster site

Rescuers free female worker trapped for more than two weeks

<p>Rescue workers continue their search of the remains of a garment factory complex that collapsed on April 26 (AFP photo/Munir Uz Zaman)</p>

Rescue workers continue their search of the remains of a garment factory complex that collapsed on April 26 (AFP photo/Munir Uz Zaman)

  • AFP, Dhaka
  • Bangladesh
  • May 10, 2013
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A woman was pulled alive on Friday from the ruins of a garment factory complex in Bangladesh more than 16 days after it collapsed and killed over 1,000 people, live television footage showed.

The miraculous rescue came shortly after emergency officials announced that the woman called Reshmi had been located under the rubble of the nine-story Rana Plaza complex after crying out for help.

A report on Bangladesh's Somoy TV said that she had been found sheltering in the ruins of a basement mosque.

Rescuers cheered loudly as she was carried to an army ambulance, managing a faint smile at the crowds who had gathered.

The country's fire service chief said that the woman appeared to have had access to water during her marathon ordeal trapped underneath the wreckage of the building which had caved in on April 24.

One of the rescuers said that the woman had cried out for help as recovery teams sifted through the wreckage in the town of Savar on the outskirts of the capital Dhaka.

“As we were clearing rubble, we called out if anyone was alive,” the unnamed rescuer told the private Somoy TV channel. “Then we heard her saying 'please save me, please save me'.”

Another rescuer said that the woman had had access to food supplies for the first fortnight of her ordeal but had run out two days ago.

“She said she has not eaten for the last two days. She said she has eaten some dried food like biscuits,'' said the rescuer.  “She said she had found a safe place and found some air and light.''

News of the miracle survival came as recovery teams were preparing to wrap up their work at the site after discovering scores more corpses in the tangle of concrete overnight.

Brigadier General Siddiqul Alam, one of the leaders of the recovery operation, said the toll now stands at 1,041, making it one of the world's deadliest industrial disasters.

Alam said many of the bodies were little more than skeletons and the stench from under the rubble suggested that many more were still to be located.

“We have found a huge number of bodies in the stairwell and under the staircases. When the building started to collapse, workers thought they would be safe under the staircases,'' he said.

“Each time we moved a slab of concrete, we found a stack of bodies.''

More than 3,000 workers were on shift on the morning of April 24 when the building suddenly caved in.

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