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Christian group opposes naval base

Calls on all religions to unite in fight against building of military instillation

The CCA press conference yesterday The CCA press conference yesterday
  • by ucan staff, Seoul
  • Korea
  • August 11, 2011
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The Christian Conference of Asia (CCA) is calling on other religions to unite in opposition to the construction of a naval base on Jeju island.

The call came yesterday at a press conference following an August 8-10 visit to the island by a CCA delegation.

The delegation was led by Reverend Roger Gaikwad, general secretary of the National Council of Churches in India.

“Jeju island, like Okinawa in Japan, will represent an expansion of the geopolitical influence and military control of the U.S, and will potentially become a target of military attacks from contending powers in the region,” they said in a statement.

“Gangjeong, where the base is being built, is a farming and fishing village. This base will destroy the livelihood of the villagers,” the statement said.

“Marine life such as rare plants, animals and corals will be severely impacted as well,” it added.

The government announced plans to build the naval base, which will be able to accommodate 20 warships,   in 2002. Construction began in 2009 and is expected to be completed in 2014.

The delegation also criticized the government for consulting with only 80 villagers and ignoring the opposition of more than 90 percent of the 1,800 population, calling the consultation process very undemocratic.

"We will bring this issue to the world’s attention through various means and we request support from other religions in this fight," the delegation added.

The CCA is based in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand, and consists of about 100 member Churches in 19 countries.

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